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The Moving Story Of 200 Cancer Patients

YOU THINK MOVING INTO A NEW HOME OR APARTMENT IS A CHALLENGE?  IMAGINE TRYING TO MOVE 200 CANCER PATIENTS INTO A NEW HOSPITAL - IN 12 HOURS!


THAT’S WHAT HAPPENED TODAY AT THE JAMES CANCER HOSPITAL AND SOLOVE RESEARCH INSTITUTE AT THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY.


IN ONE MASSIVE EFFORT, ALL THE PATIENTS, DOCTORS, RESEARCHERS AND NURSES WERE MOVED INTO A NEW STATE OF THE ART HOSPITAL THAT’S BEING CALLED THE FUTURE OF CANCER CARE.

THIS MAMMOTH MOVE TOOK 700 VOLUNTEERS AND UTILIZED TWO COMMAND CENTERS - ONE SENDING PATIENTS AND ONE RECEIVING. SPOTTERS WERE POSITIONED ALONG ALL PARTS OF THE MOVE ROUTE TO ENSURE NO PATIENT WAS EVER OUT OF SIGHT.

EACH PATIENT, SOME OF THEM IN HOSPITAL BEDS, OTHERS IN WHEELCHAIRS, TOOK APPROXIMATELY 20 MINUTES TO MOVE THE DISTANCE OF A QUARTER OF A MILE FROM THEIR OLD ROOM TO A BRAND NEW ONE. EVEN THE ELEVATORS WERE PRECISION TIMED TO INCREASE MOVE ACCURACY.

PULLING OFF THIS LOGISTICAL FEAT WITH SEAMLESS CARE FOR EVEN THE MOST CRITICAL CANCER PATIENTS IS A PROJECT THAT TOOK TWO YEARS TO PLAN AND TWELVE HOURS TO EXECUTE.

CANCER DOCTORS SAY THAT THIS NEW BUILDING IS NOT JUST ABOUT THE TECHNOLOGY, BUT ABOUT THE OVERALL PATIENT EXPERIENCE.

 

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Rate Of Kids Injured By Toys Jumps 40% Since 1990

Ride-on toys, especially foot-powered scooters, responsible for rate increase

(COLUMBUS, Ohio) December 2014 – Just in time for the holiday shopping season, researchers have published the most comprehensive study to date on toy-related injuries in children.  Experts analyzed 22 years of data and found that from 1990 through 2011 the rate of toy-related injuries in children increased by nearly 40 percent.  In 2011, a child was treated in a U.S. emergency department every 3 minutes for a toy-related injury, including a surprising number who were injured riding foot-powered scooters.

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Device Controls Brain Activity To Maximize Therapy

Magnets send pulses through scalp, into patient’s brain to “prep” for therapy

(COLUMBUS, Ohio) November 2014 – In an effort to help patients more fully recover from stroke, researchers are using a novel device that allows them to control a patient’s brain activity prior to therapy.  “Often what happens after a stroke is that the healthy side tends to overcompensate for the injured side,” said Dr. Marcie Bockbrader, who is leading the study at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center.  When that happens, the body may not receive clear enough messages from the injured of the brain telling it how to function properly.

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Therapies Used In Preemies May Surprise You

From a jolt of caffeine to a dose of Viagra®, doctors adapt adult drugs for tiny babies

(COLUMBUS, Ohio) November 2014 – By the time you read this article, another baby will be born prematurely in this country.  It happens more than 450,000 times each year and the numbers continue to climb.  In the last generation alone the number of premature births has risen more than 35 percent.

Treating those tiny babies usually. . . read more

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Nurses Text, Send Images From O-R With New App

Safe, secure app is designed to keep parents up to date during surgery, ease tensions while they wait

Orlando, Fla - Just as one nurse gently placed a mask on 8 year old Calvin Barr to administer anesthesia before his spinal surgery recently, another quietly stepped to the foot of the bed and snapped a photo of him with a smartphone.  Calvin playfully squinted at the nurse with the phone and through the clear blue mask you could see a faint smile.

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